Posts Tagged ‘Lewisham’

Joseph Henry Blackburne lived here

June 4, 2017

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50 Sandrock Road

J. H. Blackburne dominated British chess during the second half of the 19th century, and at one point he was the world’s second most successful player.

He is perhaps best known for losing heavily to Wilhelm Steinitz and for taking it badly, but according to the biography by Tim Harding he was living in 9 Whitbread Road, Brockley at the time of the 1901 census, later moving to 45 Sandrock Road and then number 50 in the same road, where he died on 1 September 1924.

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45 Sandrock Road

So number 45 has changed over the years more radically than number 50, but not as radically as the place in 9 Whitbread Road.

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Presumed site of 9 Whitbread Road

Now then, it is known that Blackburne was bombed-out during a German raid in the First World War, but the dates are such that it’s unlikely the view above came into being that way.

blackburne

J. H. Blackburne (1841-1924)

Now then Steinitz apparently lived in Shoreditch, which only adds to my suspicions that he was really Karl Marx on his day off…

What does ‘The Information Capital’ have to do with South London?

January 3, 2015

infocap

This book presents 100 maps and graphics that will change the way you view the city.  Leaving aside Oliver Uberti’s…sketches…of some of the animals to be found in London Zoo, let’s have a look at some data and see what it means for South London.

South London--City Of Dreadful Night

South London–City Of Dreadful Night

The illustration above shows the locations where pictures posted on Flickr were taken.  Not South London it seems, apart from the Elephant, Walworth Road and Greenwich Park.  South Londoners are condemned to perpetual darkness, starved of the light of exposure on Flickr…

Concentrations of crime

Concentrations of violent crime

Here we see violent crime hotspots, which seem to pick out railway/Underground stations with unerring accuracy.  3 is Brixton, 8 the Elephant, 9 Peckham, 10 Croydon, 18 Woolwich.

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Deprivation

Above we see deprivation, coloured according to the scheme below:

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So, Lewisham varies between ‘Most deprived’ red and a yellow which has no label but probably means something neutral. If the green was instead blue on this map, one might begin to suspect some hidden agenda…

 

How we get to work...

How we get to work…

Here we have the most popular modes of transport for getting to work by home location, coded according to the scheme below.

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Cor, that’s found me out–when I lived in Peckham I used to get the bus to work, but now I get the train. Are those light blue types really driving to work or to the station say?

Occupational tree (or graph)

Occupational tree (or graph)

Now this would be really interesting if it was explained properly.  The idea is that wards are grouped together according to their concentrations of different job types; but we don’t learn what the distances or branching or angles mean.  My earliest memories are of Charlton 50 years ago and I’ve made it as far as Crofton Park, or travelled 3 nodes on this map.  Clearly I’ve not made very much progress at all, but it would be nice to know the details of my lack of achievement.

Cohabiting in Peckham

Cohabiting in Peckham

As for that love and romance thing, it is suggested that cohabiting is prevalent in Peckham (above) separation is noteworthy in New Cross (below).

Separated in New Cross

Separated in New Cross

Finally, we return to dodgy statistics on obesity.  The figure below shows obesity…

Obesity

Obesity

or rather, the boroughs expanded or contracted to reflect the percentage of 10-11 year olds there classified obese in 2012-13.  Which is a slightly strange measure to use–presumably those were the figures closest to hand.

So, Sarf London: a land of obesity and irregular liaisons, subsisting in obscurity (apart from Greenwich Park during the Olympics), lit only by the odd flare of crime…And no Tube either…

 

A shameful story about obesity

November 1, 2014

The figure above caused some animated discussion on Brockley Central, with many recondite hypotheses being advanced to explain the seeming kinship between South London and unimaginably remote parts of the North.

The first thing to do is to work out what this data is and what it might be telling us.  It certainly looks like Table 7.3, Finished Admission Episodes with a primary diagnosis of obesity, by Government Office Region (GOR) of residence, Strategic Health Authority (SHA) of residence, Primary Care Trust (PCT) of residence and gender, 2012/13 from the data here.  So what are these episodes about?  There are 10,957 of them, and there are 8,024 in Table 7.8 Finished Consultant Episodes with a primary diagnosis of obesity and a main or secondary procedure of ‘Bariatric Surgery’ by Government Office Region (GOR) of residence, Strategic Health Authority (SHA)  of residence, Primary Care Trust (PCT) of residence and gender, 2012/13.  While ‘Admission Episodes’ and ‘Consultant Episodes’ aren’t quite the same, it’s clear that T7.3 is largely about ‘bariatric surgery’, which includes stomach stapling, gastric bypasses and sleeve gastrectomy.  These procedures have traditionally had a fairly marginal place in the NHS, so we suspect that differences in the willingness to perform or to pay for these procedures may be the operative factor here.

There is data specifically on obesity here.  That gives a ‘Top 10’ as follows, which is rather different from the list we started with above–note that the sample for City of London is probably too small to draw definite conclusions.

TABLE OF TOP 10 ENGLISH LOCAL AUTHORITIES FOR OBESITY

Area Name Weighted Sample % Obese
Halton 309 35.2%
Barnsley 609 34.4%
South Holland 231 32.5%
Mansfield 274 32.4%
Telford and Wrekin 401 32.3%
North Lincolnshire 424 32.0%
Barking and Dagenham 409 31.6%
East Lindsey 363 31.6%
Thurrock 379 31.4%
City of London 20 31.4%

While not all of the areas in the two datasets are identical, we can make a reasonable job of combining them for London as below.

CHART OF OBESITY ADMISSIONS AGAINST PREVALENCE

CHART

Any relationship between the two is rather slight, and it does seem that Lambeth, Southwark and Lewisham have high rates of admission for their prevalence of obesity, rather than high obesity as such. It seems reasonable to conclude that we are seeing wide variations in the propensity to subject obesity to hospital treatments, rather than in obesity as such.

Inner London’s economy: What does it mean for Lewisham?

October 22, 2014

The Centre for Cities published a report entitled Inner London’s economy: a ward level analysis of the business and employment base   in October 2013.  It doesn’t look particularly encouraging for Lewisham, as in the following illustrations.

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Their Figure 2 shows that the population decreases during the day, implying that people go elsewhere to work (or perhaps study).

lewfig3Figure 3 shows no sign at all of any concentration of businesses  that might serve as a nucleus for further developments.

lewfig7Similarly, Figure 7 shows a rather limited number of start-ups.

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This may be explained, at least in part, by Figure 9, which shows that the accessibility of public transport is far from great.

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The maximum broadband speeds in Figure 10 might be more encouraging for Lewisham…if it wasn’t overshadowed by the need to make a point about more glamorous places…

So in conclusion we get a picture of Lewisham as somewhere people live so that they can work elsewhere but the state of the transport links means it’s not too easy.  That sounds like many parts of London in the 1970s:  a decaying nowhere, but surprisingly close at hand.  To be optimistic, it may be that even a slight improvement in transport will mean a substantial increase in house prices for Lewisham residents, and an influx of employment so they don’t have to use the transport after all.

 

 

Books in Some Charity Shops of South London: Part 5, Lewisham

July 15, 2012

This part of the study was carried out over an extended timescale, with the data on the contents of the Charity Research and Red Cross shops being collected on 1 February, while all of the opening times and the contents of the Scope shop were surveyed on 12 July.

The Cancer Research shop at 135 Lewisham High Street had 5 shelves containing 160 or so books, of which one might have interested me.

Information on opening hours is pictured below:

Maybe they’re the same as for their shop in Blackheath.

The Scope shop at 7 Lewis Grove had 6 shelves containing 160 books.

The opening hours are pictured below:

The British Red Cross shop at 94 High Street had 11 shelves and say 350 books.  I was quite tempted by The rest is noise at £ 2-50.

And opening hours:

Lewisham: A land without Tories?

May 8, 2010

Well, it seems that way at the moment, pending a recount in Grove Park ward.  And one of my predictions was proved wrong as Labour supporters turned out in some numbers to avert the horror of a Conservative Government.

Rise like Lions after slumber
In unvanquishable number,
Shake your chains to earth like dew
Which in sleep had fallen on you –
Ye are many – they are few.

Overall, I managed 1/4, about the same level as my Indo-European homework in Leiden.  What about that Lib Dem in Crofton Park then?  Bizarre…Strange that the polls were right, about the Tories and Labour anyway.

Doing all right so far...

More predictions

What will Clegg do now?

When the capital by the Thames
Forgetting her greatness
Like a drunken prostitute
Does not know who will next have her.

His party won’t allow a coalition with the Tories without PR, which Cameron isn’t going to give him.  And anyway it was a coalition with the Tories in the National Government of 1931 that did for the Liberals originally.  The problem with a Lib/Lab or Lib/Lab/PC/SNP/Green coalition is that they were all losers in the election (with the possible exception of the Greens) and so the arrangement wouldn’t have much legitimacy.

As far as I can see, he has two possible options:

i)   convene a meeting of the parties’ economics teams (as he suggested in one of the TV debates) with the stated aim  of agreeing a programme to tackle the deficit, in the hope of gathering some credit and fishing successfully  in muddy waters;

ii) offer guarded  support to a Tory (or Tory/Unionist) Government from a ‘safe’ distance.  The main thing would be to somehow prevent Cameron from calling a General Election when it suited him…

Update 11 May:  in fact, there are now 2 Tories left in Grove Park.

Sputnick, 88-92 Lee High Road

March 30, 2010

Spootnitsk

That spelling does suggest a pronunciation of  ‘Spootnitsk’, but never mind–this certainly seems to be one of the more substantial Baltic-Russian shops around the place.  Inside, there is (and has always been) a nice, clean, tidy grocery, together with an ever-diminishing shelf of books in Russian (I’ve never yet been moved to buy one) and some Baltic newspapers.  OK, newspapers in languages belonging to the Baltic family (Latvian and Lithuanian) rather than Estonian (Finno-Ugric family).

The section on the right as you look at the photo used to sell vodka and DVDs, now they’ve turned it into a beauty salon (that apparently does no business at all).  How about a dermatological-venereological-cosmetological clinic?–there are some Chinese versions of that kind of thing further along the road.

Maybe not with that picture window…

Oakam, 92 High Street Lewisham

March 30, 2010

APR 76.9%!

This place caught my eye today–at first I couldn’t believe the APR of 79.6%, then I thought at least they were stating it openly.  In fact, there are some much higher APRs on their website.

'Think again!', depending on how desperate you are

I also couldn’t decide whether the notice announcing the languages spoken was a sweet attempt to be helpful or a sign of determination to exploit new arrivals.

Lietuvių ‘must be’ Lithuanian, since ‘Litva’ is Russian for Lithuania.  Why Slovak and not Czech?  Probably because the Czech Republic is more prosperous, so there are fewer migrants here–Lithuania is supposed to be the poorest state in the EU (in terms of people’s incomes) so that makes sense.

Cosmopolitan or what?