Posts Tagged ‘courses’

Free Online Sanskrit Course

August 31, 2017

sanskrit

We came across the details above, and there is also a Facebook group here.   It will be interesting to see if people complain about the course book–people always seem to have objections to Sanskrit textbooks, as in the discussion here.

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Rachel’s Biblical Hebrew Class 2015/16

September 29, 2015

shema

For those interested in the more advanced kind of Biblical Hebrew class in London, Rachel Montagu has kindly sent details as below.  The course takes place in the West Central Liberal Synagogue, 21 Maple Street.  The cost averages around £130 per term but varies depending on how long a term and how many are in the class.

In my experience, these classes work in the time-honoured fashion: each student in turn reads a verse aloud and then translates it, with input from the teacher as necessary. She also provides some background and interpretation from traditional Jewish teaching.

The emphasis is certainly on understanding the text rather than grammar as such. In my experience, there have been perhaps an average of seven or so students coming to lessons. The level things are taken at tends to depend on who the students are.

In principle, students should have covered the material in the First Hebrew Primer from Eks before starting this class. If you know the qal conjugation (perfect and imperfect) pretty well for verbs with three strong roots (the ‘regular’ ones if you like) and have some idea about hiphil and niphal and verbs with weak roots, that will probably do.

If you want to know more, you can email Rachel;  or feel free to email me if you’re feeling shy.  I’ve also shared just about everything I know about studying Biblical Hebrew with the world here.

Autumn Term
A Singing Start
7th October Psalms 115, 100
14th October Exodus 14:11-15:5
21nd October Exodus 15:6-27
[28th October half-term]
4th November Judges 4:4-5:4
11th November Judges 5:5-31

Times and Seasons
18th November Leviticus 23:1-22
25th November Leviticus 23: 23-44
2nd December Leviticus 25:1-24
9th December Leviticus 25:25-54

Spring Term

Numbers: Learning how to Live Together and Worship Together
13th January Numbers 9:1-23
20th January Numbers 10:1-12, 29-36, 16:1-6
27th January Numbers 16:7-35
3rd February Numbers 17:1-18:7
[10th February Ash Wednesday]
17th February Numbers 20:1-26
[24th February half term]
2nd March Numbers 20:27-21:25

Nachum: Prophet of Good Tidings?
9th March Nachum 1:1-2:9
16th March Nachum 2:10-3:19

Summer Term

Isaiah and the Suffering Servant
13th April Isaiah 41:6-13, 42:1-10, 43:1-5
20th April Isaiah 43:6-13, 49:1-13
27th April Isaiah 50:4-10, 52:13-53:12

Samuel and Saul
4th May 1 Samuel 8:1-22
11th May 1 Samuel 9:1-27
18th May 1 Samuel 10:1-27
[25th May half term]
1st June 1 Samuel 12:1-25
8th June 1 Samuel 13:1-18, 15:1-9
15th June 1 Samuel 15:10-34

Psalms
22nd June Psalms 111:1-22, 112:1-10
29th June Psalms 11211-22, 145:1-21
6th July Psalms 34:1-23, 25:1-10
13th July Psalms 25:11-22

A 3 month Biblical Hebrew course in Israel

May 17, 2015
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Gratuitous picture of Magdala

 

We have received the following query:

I’m wondering if you could recommend a 3 month Biblical Hebrew course in Israel…I have the time from  July to Sep available this year.

My first response would be that this may be confusing the end with the means–if you want to learn Biblical Hebrew or anything else the best thing is to get on with it here and now.  Do what you can, with what you have, where you are–a sentiment famously endorsed by Theodore Roosevelt.  If you are an undergraduate doing a year abroad, then the university will try to make you learn something just by being there, but in other circumstances it’s all a bit more uncertain.

As for answering the question as posed, I suspect that if you want a particular set period the best thing would be to find a private tutor.  You could look at craigslist for instance and there is a listing of Israeli free ads sites here. Even better–post an ad yourself saying what you’re looking for.

As to actually existing courses, you could try the Biblical Language Center–Randall Buth did inform me that they would be doing courses in Israel in 2015, so you could write and ask him about that.  There is also a summer course at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.  Again if I were you I would write to the coordinator, Steven Fassberg and ask if he had any suggestions.   The Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs has a page about English programs in Israeli universities and you can also write to them.

So my advice would be:

i)  make sure that you are clear about the what and the how in your intentions;

ii)  ask around!

Aesthetics: Art and Anti-Art

April 22, 2015

We present below the outline of this course at City Lit.  It looks not unchallenging–we shall see…

Kant (1724-1804) wrote three books with’critique’in the title: the Critique of Pure Reason (1781, 1787), the Critique of Practical Reason (1788) and the Critique of the Power of Judgment (1790). His central problem is to explain our ability to act according to a moral assessment of a way of life. In short, how is enlightenment possible? The first Critique is a study of the limits of knowledge. The second is a study of the intelligibility of moral judgments. The third is a study of the relationship between science and morality. Oddly, Kant devotes the first part of the third Critique to what he calls pure aesthetic judgments. The influence of his analysis of them – of his ‘Analytic of the Beautiful’ – extends well beyond the limits of academic philosophy.

In making our basic assumptions about art and beauty explicit, Kant sets some central problems not only for philosophical aesthetics, but also for the sociology and anthropology of art. Accordingly, we are going to be considering the ideas of four theorists: the philosopher Hans-Georg Gadamer (1900-2002), the critical theorist Theodor Adorno (1903-1969), the sociologist Pierre Bourdieu (1930-2002) and the anthropologist Alfred Gell (1945-1997). All of them have used Kant to clarify their aims. So we need to begin with the basics: Kant’s
analysis of our ways of talking about objects of taste.

21 April

Unlike a person’s reasons for doing a course on something else, your reasons for doing a course on aesthetics are examples of what we’ll be talking about. This is bound to be confusing at times.

28 April

Kant draws a crucial distinction between agreeableness and beauty. To claim that an object is agreeable is just to claim that it gives me pleasure. To claim that an object is beautiful is to claim that it ought to give me pleasure
(regardless of whether it actually does). The point of Kant’s ‘critique’ of aesthetic judgment is to make sense of the distinction.

5 May

Kant regards the pleasure of aesthetic reflection as a kind of satisfaction. An object gives us pleasure if it allows us to do something we want to do. And a beautiful object gives us pleasure. The question, then, is what a beautiful allows us to do. Kant’s basic answer is that it allows us to exercise our imagination unrestricted by rules.

12 May

Kant’s aesthetics anticipates discussion in twentieth-century philosophy of the problem of practical understanding. The problem he sets himself is to explain the idea of an indeterminate norm of taste. It anticipates the problem
of Wittgenstein’s famous discussion of rules and rule-following.

19 May

Our tendency to regard to aesthetic judgments as merely subjective may be due to a misconception of the relationship between thought and language. Heidegger denies that the subject is first of all a kind of spectator and insists on the primacy of practical activity. His analysis of ‘being-inthe-world’ lays the ground for a different way of thinking about aesthetic judgments.

26 May

Gadamer denies that the objectivity of scientific method is the only kind there is. In the popular imagination, science puts everything to test. lt also seems to be the opposite of aesthetic reflection. There is no science of beauty. But there may still be another kind of objectivity, the objectivity of interpretations
of works of art.

2 June

Some of Adorno’s readers have accused him of elitism. He draws a distinction between authentic ad and the products of the culture industry. Authentic art reveals the truth about society. It does so not by representing
society, but by being impossible to represent. Unlike the products of the culture industry, it helps us think the unthinkable about the modern world.

9 June

There is culture – in the anthropological sense of the word – wherever there are human beings. There is as much of it in the practices of a so-called primitive society as there is in our own, and as much at a performance of
stand up comedy as there is at a performance of Swan Lake. This makes cultural refinement a possible topic of anthropological investigation.

16 June

Bourdieu takes aesthetics out of the hands of philosophers and puts it into the hands of sociologists. He offers “a scientific answer to the old questions of Kant’s critique of judgment, by seeking in the structure of the social
classes the basis of systems of classification which structure our perception of the social world and designate the objects of aesthetic enjoyment.”

23 June

Anthropologists have struggled to make sense of the idea of ethnographic art. Are museum exhibits artworks if, for the members of a so-called primitive society, there is no equivalent of our category of art? Gell reverses the
problem. Instead of contemplating the artefacts of an exotic culture as artworks, he considers uses to which artworks are put. His central idea is that artworks are agents.

30 June

In your opinion, is John Cage’s 4’33” worth taking seriously? ls it a piece of
music? ls it a work of art? ls it (or has a performance of it ever been)
beautiful?

7 July

Review

Finishing off Agamemnon at Madingley Hall

November 30, 2014
Happy Helllenists

Happy Hellenists

I strike him twice and in two cries of oimoi
his limbs gave way, and I give him once fallen
a third blow in addition

A slightly reinforced group completed its assault on the most formidable text in surviving Greek literature under the leadership of Tony Verity, who congratulated his team on their heroic achievement.  The seven participants each in turn read aloud and translated passages of 10-15 lines and the group covered a bit more than 100 lines per 90-minute session.  I certainly learned some interesting things about the use of different metres and how the agon between two parties sometimes came down to whose metre would prevail.

During our free time on Saturday afternoon, I wandered round the grounds and took some photographs (as well as getting muddy).

Madingley Hall in the Autumn sunshine

Madingley Hall in the Autumn sunshine

We also had a talk from Dr Lucilla Burn of the Fitzwilliam Museum on Greek Myths (as illustrated by Greek vases).

Enigmatic vase from the Fitzwilliam with pigs

Enigmatic vase from the Fitzwilliam with pigs

More about Greek at Madingley here.

Rachel Montagu’s Biblical Hebrew class 2014/15

October 23, 2014

Rachel Montagu has kindly sent some details of her Biblical Hebrew course for 2014-15.

These classes work in the time-honoured fashion: each student in turn reads a verse aloud and then translates it, with input from the teacher as necessary. She also provides some background and interpretation from traditional Jewish teaching.

The emphasis is certainly on understanding the text rather than grammar as such. In my experience, there have been perhaps an average of seven or so students coming to lessons. The level things are taken at tends to depend on who the students are.

In principle, students should have covered the material in the First Hebrew Primer from Eks before starting this class. If you know the qal conjugation (perfect and imperfect) pretty well for verbs with three strong roots (the ‘regular’ ones if you like) and have some idea about hiphil and niphal and verbs with weak roots, that will probably do.

If you want to know more, you can email Rachel;  or feel free to email me if you’re feeling shy.  I’ve also shared just about everything I know about studying Biblical Hebrew with the world here.

Dear All

I hope you had a good summer

I’m writing to let you know that I hope the Wednesday evening Hebrew class
will run again this year. Liberal Judaism have agreed to host us again at
the West Central Liberal Synagogue in Maple St.  Please let me know if you will be coming so I can let them have a list of names for security purposes.

Term will not begin until 22/10 – too many festivals on Wednesday evenings
between now and then. [NOAI:  I think the classes run from 1830 to 2030.]

If anyone would find a daytime class more convenient, City Lit is hoping
to start a level 3 course this year – look on their website for further
details – term there will be 23/10 – 18/12 and the class will be
1.30-3.00pm

[…..]

Best wishes

Rachel

Hebrew Class Wed Outline 2014-5

 

Autumn Term

 

The Beginning: A Very Good Place to Start

22nd October              Genesis 1:1-23

29th October                Genesis 1:24-2:17

5th November             Genesis 2:18-3:15

12th November            Genesis 3:16-4:15

 

Texts of Terror from Judges

19th November                        Judges 9:1-25

26th November                        Judges 9:50-56, 11:1-11, 29-34

3rd December                          Judges 11:35-40, 12:1-7, 19:1-10

10th December                        Judges 19:11-30

17th December                         Judges 21:1:25

 

Spring Term

 

Habakkuk

7th January                  Habakkuk 1:1-17

14th January                Habakkuk 2:1-20

21st January               Habakkuk 3:1-19

 

Exodus and Ezekiel: Temple Building

28th January                Exodus 38:1-25

4th February               Exodus 38:26-21

11th February             Exodus 40:17-38

[18th February half term – Ash Wednesday]

25th February             Ezekiel 40:1-23

[4th March       no class – Purim]

11th March                  Ezekiel 40:24-49

18th March                  Ezekiel 41:1-26

25th March                  Ezekiel 42:1-20

 

Summer Term

 

Exodus and Ezekiel: Temple Building continued

15th April                      Ezekiel 43:1-27

22nd April                    Ezekiel 44:1-28

 

Dare to Read a Daniel

29th April                      Daniel 1:1-2:4

6th May                        Daniel 8:1-27

13th May                      Daniel 9:1-27

20th May                    Daniel 10:1-21

[27th May                     half term]

3thJune                        Daniel 12:1-13

 

Numbers: Blessings, prophesy and complaints

10th June                     Numbers 6:1-27

17th June                     Numbers 11:1-24

24th June                     Numbers 11:25-12:16

 

Psalms

1st July                        Psalms 81, 84, 100

8th July                        Psalms 85, 86, 111

15th July                     Psalms 91, 92, 93

Half of ‘Agamemnon’ at Madingley Hall (12-14 September)

September 16, 2014
A refractory passage from the 'Agamemnon'

A refractory passage from the ‘Agamemnon’

To start off with, Tony Verity emailed us:

A message for you in preparation for tackling Aeschylus at his most baffling.

To the brave Aeschylus group:

I’d forgotten how tough the Greek is in Agamemnon, especially the parodos and choruses. I must have read the play a dozen times, but I’m still finding it hard here and there to puzzle out the language, much to my annoyance. It’s not helped by the text being dodgy in places.

We were in fact due to go as far as line 809 this time, with the remainder to come in November.  The six brave souls assembled were keen to tackle every last knotty problem in the Greek text, though some may have suffered more than others in the attempt.  As I explained to more than one person over dinner, the format was to go round the group in order with each student reading aloud then translating, and the tutor helping and commenting.  We did in fact manage the to achieve the scheduled 809 lines by means of a spirited joint attack on the chorus at the end.

I think this was about the most rewarding Greek reading group I’ve been to,  probably due to having a small group and a text that forced itself in people’s attention, as well as a very inspiring tutor.  The other candidate would be doing Aristotle with the great and good Barbara Goward, where once again the text made claims that a rather small group could not dismiss as that’s all very lovely.

We had a talk from Malcolm Schofield, Emeritus Professor of Ancient Philosophy at Cambridge, and he also called the Agamemnon the most formidable text in surviving Greek literature.  Apart from that, he was talking about love and the Symposium, where Aristophanes had defined love as the desire for wholeness, Agathon as the desire for beauty, and Diotima as the desire for immortal goodness.  After that, Alcibiades had rather muddied the waters.  One was not meant to understand the character of Socrates, and there was a lot about him that was unappealing.

We also had a meeting to discuss future texts for the Advanced groups, and I discovered (what I had not noticed) a set pattern:  Homer for both groups in February, a shorter text for both the poetry and prose groups in May, and one longer piece of poetry/prose occupying both September and November.

In giving general suggestions for courses on my feedback form, I suggested that on the one hand Madingley could do life skills courses aimed at their specific demographic (to be based on research evidence of course):  Preparing for retirement, Managing your investments, while on the other hand recidivist readers of classical texts might benefit from some systematic instruction in linguistics, a course in Proto-Indo-European/historical linguistics, a course on the Ancient Economy (especially demography).

You can see the Madingley course listing here.  Do feel free to  write to me  if you have a query about all this I might be able to help with!

 

 

 

 

Immersion Courses in Classical Languages

March 23, 2014
Lexington, Kentucky--where they do Latin

Lexington, Kentucky–where they do Latin

This blog took part in some discussion about possibilities for an immersion course in an ancient language (basically Latin or  Greek) in 2014 with the following results.

The obvious answer would be something in Latin,  and there did indeed turn out to be such things in the US:  Conversational Latin Seminars at the University of Kentucky in Lexington and, with a Roman Catholic connection, Latin Summer Immersion at Wyoming Catholic College, Cenaculum Sancti Hieronymi in Mobile, Alabama.  (Now you can see some despatches from Lexington here.)

Outside of the US, Accademia Vivarium Novum is an eight-week intensive Latin course in Rome (with the possibility of some Greek as well).  Staying in Rome, the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross offers intensive summer courses in Latin, Greek (Koine) and Biblical Hebrew.  Now they seem to be connected with the Polis Institute in Jerusalem, who have summer courses in Latin and Syriac.  They also have a textbook, Polis : Parler le grec ancien comme une langue vivante, as well as Latin and (Koine) Greek courses in Barcelona and Latin and Greek courses in Florida.

Having apparently abandoned Israel, the Biblical Language Centre will be doing a Biblical Hebrew/Koine Greek Ulpan in North Carolina.

Finally, the Paideia Institute offers Living (Medieval) Latin in Paris, Living Latin in Rome and Living Greek in Greece (and they also do telepaideia, online courses in conversational Latin and Attic).  Living Greek in Greece is an intensive introduction to spoken to Attic Greek.  In two seminar-style meetings per day, participants read and discuss ancient Greek literature and philosophy in Attic Greek.  Each year, readings are organized around a set theme.  The theme for 2014 is Dionysus.  The readings are Euripides’ Bacchae and the Homeric Hymns to Dionysus.  Now that sounds well exciting, like something out of Donna Tartt…At the same venue, one can also Speak and philosophize in Ancient Greek (scroll some way down the page!)

Rachel’s Hebrew Class 2013/14

September 25, 2013

Rachel Montagu has kindly sent some details of her Biblical Hebrew course for 2013-14.  This stands in place of the course she used to teach at Birkbeck.

Rachel’s courses work in the classic fashion: each student in turn reads a verse aloud and then translates it, with input from the teacher as necessary. She also provides some background and interpretation from traditional Jewish teaching.

The emphasis is certainly on understanding the text rather than grammar as such. In my experience, there have been perhaps an average of seven or so students coming to lessons. The level things are taken at tends to depend on who the students are.

In principle, students should have covered the material in the First Hebrew Primer from Eks before starting this class. If you know the qal conjugation (perfect and imperfect) pretty well for verbs with three strong roots (the ‘regular’ ones if you like) and have some idea about hiphil and niphal and verbs with weak roots, that will probably do.

If you want to know more, you can email Rachel;  or feel free to email me if you’re feeling shy.  I’ve also shared just about everything I know about studying Biblical Hebrew with the world here.

Dear all

This year we will be meeting on Wednesdays, starting this week Wednesday
2nd October from 6.30-8.30.

The West Central Synagogue and Liberal Judaism are still kindly offering us hospitality at

The Montagu Centre
21 Maple Street
London W1T 4BE

This is near to Warren St and Gt Portland St tube stations and just off the Tottenham Court Rd.

If you’re interested in this, you can email her directly.  Or if you’re feeling shy you can email me instead.  The schedule is as given below.

Autumn Term

Amos – Prophet of Tekoa

2nd October Amos 1:1-8, 2:4-12

9th October Amos 2:13-16, 3:1-12,

16th October Amos 4:1-13, 5:4, 5:10-15

23rd October Amos 5:21-27, 6:1-12,

[30th October – half term]

6th November Amos 7:4-16, 8:4-10

13th November Amos 8:11-14, 9:1-3, 9:7-15

Lamentations – A Time to Weep

20th November Lamentations 1:1-18

27th November Lamentations 1:19-22, 3:1-40

4th December Lamentations 3:41-66, 4:13-22

11th December Lamentations 5:1-22

Spring Term

Elijah and Elisha: Master and Student

8th January I Kings 17:1-16

15th January I Kings 17:18-24, 18:16-29

22nd January I Kings 18:30-46, 19:1-4

29th January I Kings 19:5-21,

5th February II Kings 1:1-17

12th February II Kings 2:1-25

[19th February half term]

26th February II Kings 4:1-20

5th March II Kings 4:21-44

12th March II Kings 5:1-19

19th March II Kings 5:20-27, 6:8-23

Micah – Powerful Prophet

26th March Micah 3:5-12, 4:1-10, 5:1-4

2nd April Micah 6:1-16, 7:5-8, 18-20

Summer Term

Esther: Wise Queens and a Foolish King

23rd April Esther 1:20

30th April Esther 1:21-22, 2:1-18

7th May Esther 2:19-23, 3:1-5

14th May Esther 3:6-15, 4:1-10,

21st May Esther 4:11-17, 5:1-14

[28th May half term]

[4thJune no class – Shavuot]

11th June Esther 6:1-14, 7:1-6

18th June Esther 7:7-10, 8:1-17

25th June Esther 9:1-20

2nd July Esther 9:21-32, 10:1-3

Psalms

9th July Psalms 142:1-8, 144:1-15

16th July Psalms 107, 43, 42

Rachel’s Hebrew Class 2012/13

October 1, 2012

Rachel Montagu has kindly sent some details of her Biblical Hebrew course for 2012-13.  This stands in place of the course she used to teach at Birkbeck.

Rachel’s courses work in the classic fashion: each student in turn reads a verse aloud and then translates it, with input from the teacher as necessary. She also provides some background and interpretation from traditional Jewish teaching.

The emphasis is certainly on understanding the text rather than grammar as such. There have been perhaps an average of seven or so students coming to lessons. The level things are taken at tends to depend on who the students are.

In principle, students should have covered the material in the First Hebrew Primer from Eks before starting this class. If you know the qal conjugation (perfect and imperfect) pretty well for verbs with three strong roots (the ‘regular’ ones if you like) and have some idea about hiphil and niphal and verbs with weak roots, that will probably do.

If you want to know more, you can email Rachel;  or feel free to email me if you’re feeling shy.  I’ve also shared just about everything I know about studying Biblical Hebrew with the world here.

Dear all

This year we will be meeting on Wednesdays, starting this week Wednesday 3rd October I hope.

Can I suggest we meet 6.45-8.45 this week and discuss during break whetherwe want to move it slightly later or earlier or whether that suits us all.

The West Central Synagogue and Liberal Judaism are still kindly offeringus hospitality at

The Montagu Centre
21 Maple Street
London W1T 4BE

This is near to Warren St and Gt Portland St tube stations and just off the Tottenham Court Rd.

If you’re interested in this, you can email her directly.  Or if you’re feeling shy you can email me instead.  The schedule is as given below.

Hebrew Class Outline 2012-3

Joshua – Entering the Land

3rd October Deut. 34:9, Joshua 1:1-18

10th October Joshua 2:1-24

17th October Joshua 3:1-17, 4:1-5

24th October Joshua 4:6-14, 5:1-15

[31st October no class – half term

7th November Joshua 6:1-27

Isaac and Rebecca: Never Mind the Romance, What about the Marriage?

14th November Genesis 24:15-40

21st November Genesis 24:41-67

28th November Genesis 25:20-28, 26:1-12, 34-35

5th December Genesis 27:1-18, 42-46, 28:1-5

Samuel v. Chronicles: David & Solomon: Succession, Wisdom & the Queen of Sheba

12th December I Kings 1:1-24

[Christmas Holiday]

9th January 1 Kings 1:25-53,

16th January I Kings 2:1-12, 1 Chron 22:1-10

23rd January 1 Chron. 22:11-19, 23:1, 28:1-10

30th January I Chron.28:11-21, 29:1-10

6th February I Chron. 29:11-30

13th February I Kings 3:1-20

[20th February half term]

27th February I Kings 3:21-28, 2 Chron 9:1-12

Isaiah – Comfort and Challenge

6th March Isaiah 40:1-20

13th March Isaiah 40:21-31, 41:8-18

20th March Isaiah 41:19-29, 42:1-11

[Passover-Easter holiday]

17th April Isaiah 42:12-25, 43:1-11

24th April Isaiah 43:25-8, 44:1-8, 21-28, 45:1-7

Does Age Bring Happiness?

1st May Ecclesiastes 1:1-18, 2:1-6

24th April Ecclesiastes 2:7-26

1st May Ecclesiastes 3:1-22

8th May Ecclesiastes 4:6, 5:1-19

[15th May – no class – Shavuot]

22nd May Ecclesiastes 7:1-25

[29th May – no class – half term]

5th June Ecclesiastes 7:26-29, 8:15, 9:1-18

12th June Ecclesiastes 11:1-10, 12:1-14

Psalms

19th June 2 Samuel 22:1-30

26th June 2 Samuel 22:31-50, 1 Chron. 16:7-17

3rd July I Chron. 16:18-37, 46:1-12

10th July Class Choice of Psalms

17th July Class Choice of Psalms