Archive for the ‘Local’ Category

7 Jews Walk, Sydenham

June 14, 2020

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Here are a couple of pictures of 7 Jews Walk, Sydenham. This was the last home of Eleanor Marx, who committed suicide by drinking poison. You have to suspect that she only chose to move there because of the name and that it’s a distorted version of something that has nothing to do with Jews.

This is not so far away from a couple of other radical addresses connected with Iskra and The Red Flag.

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As for the name, we believe the Daily Telegraph claimed that it was a corruption of “Doo’s Wharf”, Doo being an ancient place name in Kent. 

Otherwise, a local forum suggests Jews Walk was named after two Jewish brothers who lived in Westwood, a large house on the edge of Sydenham Common, where the Shenewood estate now stands. In about 1769 the brothers obtained permission from Lord Dartmouth, the Lord of the Manor, to create a tree-lined walk across the common from what is now Kirkdale to their house. This walk became known as “the Jews’ walk”. When Sydenham Common was enclosed in the early 19th century the name was retained.

According to the passages of Sydenham and Forest Hill Through Time visible on Google Books,  the Telegraph was lying. There was a building called Doo’s Wharf on the Croydon Canal, but it was named after Henry Doo the owner and anyway later than Jew’s Walk, which was indeed a tree-lined walk leading to the house of David Ximenes, a Sephardic Jewish merchant–the brother may be a Telegraph-style fabrication.

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Jews Walk in 1836

 

 

Prospects for Lewisham 2 in Division 3 of the London Chess League

June 2, 2019
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Happy chess players celebrate promotion

Now that Lewisham Chess Club’s second team has secured promotion to Division 3 of the London Chess League, we can ask what lies in store next season.

The table below shows the ranking of the various teams in this year’s Division 3, together with the average (mean!) grade of the teams they put out and faced, based on information as at 1 June.

TABLE OF RANKINGS AGAINST MEAN GRADE AND MEAN GRADE OF OPPONENTS

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The first thing to note is that there is no real difference between the strength of the opposition the various teams faced.  Intuitively enough, the teams with higher mean grades also tended to finish in higher positions, as is shown in the graph below.

GRAPH OF RANKING AGAINST MEAN GRADING

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We see that you really need to put out teams with an average grading somewhat over 140 to ensure survival.

Next we ask what this means for the various different boards next season.  In Division 4, over 8 boards (as opposed to the ten in Div 3) Lewisham 2 averaged 149, so we take the team ranked 9 in Division 3 with an average grade of 147 as a proxy.

TABLE OF GRADINGS FACED BY PROXY TEAM

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So we would say that someone playing Board 5 would face opponents with an average grade about 160 and should be of such a strength as to have a meaningful game with players graded between about 190 and about 140.

 

Joseph Henry Blackburne lived here

June 4, 2017

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50 Sandrock Road

J. H. Blackburne dominated British chess during the second half of the 19th century, and at one point he was the world’s second most successful player.

He is perhaps best known for losing heavily to Wilhelm Steinitz and for taking it badly, but according to the biography by Tim Harding he was living in 9 Whitbread Road, Brockley at the time of the 1901 census, later moving to 45 Sandrock Road and then number 50 in the same road, where he died on 1 September 1924.

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45 Sandrock Road

So number 45 has changed over the years more radically than number 50, but not as radically as the place in 9 Whitbread Road.

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Presumed site of 9 Whitbread Road

Now then, it is known that Blackburne was bombed-out during a German raid in the First World War, but the dates are such that it’s unlikely the view above came into being that way.

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J. H. Blackburne (1841-1924)

Now then Steinitz apparently lived in Shoreditch, which only adds to my suspicions that he was really Karl Marx on his day off…

Ernest Dowson died here

April 17, 2017

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159 Sangley Road

According to Arthur Symons’s memoir of Ernest Dowson:

[he] died at 26 Sandhurst Gardens, Catford, S.E on Friday morning, February 23, 1900….[he] was found one day in a Bodega with only a few shillings in his pocket, and so weak as to be hardly able to walk, by a friend, himself in some difficulties, who immediately took him back to the bricklayer’s cottage in a muddy outskirt of Catford, where he was himself living…

Meanwhile the Lewisham Council website states:

Died in the house of a friend at 26 Sandhurst Gardens (now 159 Sangley Road),

and we presume they ought to be a reliable source for addresses in Catford.

The house above looks as though it was built around 1900, so the bricklayer may have been living there while working on other houses nearby (which is why it was muddy–largely bare ground or a building site rather than houses) and letting out rooms.

Romanian shop, 27 Winslade Way SE6

September 21, 2016

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We see that Catford has responded to Brexit-inspired xenophobia with a new Romanian shop in the shopping centre.  We say:  Good luck to them!  I couldn’t see anything to show the opening hours, but there’s some information on their Facebook page.

I want to know what the name means now…Maybe:

La =  chez/da/у

Moș = old man

Dănuț =  Danny

 

Barber Shop, Thomas Lane SE6

July 20, 2016

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We present the opening times for this barber’s in Catford, since there doesn’t seem to be any reliable information on the Internet. It was certainly open at 0915 today…and I got a haircut…

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Mozart & Salieri (Rimsky-Korsakov in Catford)

June 1, 2016

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We are informed:

Following a successful run at Phoenix Artist Club, Time Zone Theatre‘s immersive take on Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s opera MOZART & SALIERI comes to the Broadway Theatre Catford for two performances only on 13th & 14th July – info and booking here

What does ‘The Information Capital’ have to do with South London?

January 3, 2015

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This book presents 100 maps and graphics that will change the way you view the city.  Leaving aside Oliver Uberti’s…sketches…of some of the animals to be found in London Zoo, let’s have a look at some data and see what it means for South London.

South London--City Of Dreadful Night

South London–City Of Dreadful Night

The illustration above shows the locations where pictures posted on Flickr were taken.  Not South London it seems, apart from the Elephant, Walworth Road and Greenwich Park.  South Londoners are condemned to perpetual darkness, starved of the light of exposure on Flickr…

Concentrations of crime

Concentrations of violent crime

Here we see violent crime hotspots, which seem to pick out railway/Underground stations with unerring accuracy.  3 is Brixton, 8 the Elephant, 9 Peckham, 10 Croydon, 18 Woolwich.

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Deprivation

Above we see deprivation, coloured according to the scheme below:

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So, Lewisham varies between ‘Most deprived’ red and a yellow which has no label but probably means something neutral. If the green was instead blue on this map, one might begin to suspect some hidden agenda…

 

How we get to work...

How we get to work…

Here we have the most popular modes of transport for getting to work by home location, coded according to the scheme below.

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Cor, that’s found me out–when I lived in Peckham I used to get the bus to work, but now I get the train. Are those light blue types really driving to work or to the station say?

Occupational tree (or graph)

Occupational tree (or graph)

Now this would be really interesting if it was explained properly.  The idea is that wards are grouped together according to their concentrations of different job types; but we don’t learn what the distances or branching or angles mean.  My earliest memories are of Charlton 50 years ago and I’ve made it as far as Crofton Park, or travelled 3 nodes on this map.  Clearly I’ve not made very much progress at all, but it would be nice to know the details of my lack of achievement.

Cohabiting in Peckham

Cohabiting in Peckham

As for that love and romance thing, it is suggested that cohabiting is prevalent in Peckham (above) separation is noteworthy in New Cross (below).

Separated in New Cross

Separated in New Cross

Finally, we return to dodgy statistics on obesity.  The figure below shows obesity…

Obesity

Obesity

or rather, the boroughs expanded or contracted to reflect the percentage of 10-11 year olds there classified obese in 2012-13.  Which is a slightly strange measure to use–presumably those were the figures closest to hand.

So, Sarf London: a land of obesity and irregular liaisons, subsisting in obscurity (apart from Greenwich Park during the Olympics), lit only by the odd flare of crime…And no Tube either…

 

A shameful story about obesity

November 1, 2014

The figure above caused some animated discussion on Brockley Central, with many recondite hypotheses being advanced to explain the seeming kinship between South London and unimaginably remote parts of the North.

The first thing to do is to work out what this data is and what it might be telling us.  It certainly looks like Table 7.3, Finished Admission Episodes with a primary diagnosis of obesity, by Government Office Region (GOR) of residence, Strategic Health Authority (SHA) of residence, Primary Care Trust (PCT) of residence and gender, 2012/13 from the data here.  So what are these episodes about?  There are 10,957 of them, and there are 8,024 in Table 7.8 Finished Consultant Episodes with a primary diagnosis of obesity and a main or secondary procedure of ‘Bariatric Surgery’ by Government Office Region (GOR) of residence, Strategic Health Authority (SHA)  of residence, Primary Care Trust (PCT) of residence and gender, 2012/13.  While ‘Admission Episodes’ and ‘Consultant Episodes’ aren’t quite the same, it’s clear that T7.3 is largely about ‘bariatric surgery’, which includes stomach stapling, gastric bypasses and sleeve gastrectomy.  These procedures have traditionally had a fairly marginal place in the NHS, so we suspect that differences in the willingness to perform or to pay for these procedures may be the operative factor here.

There is data specifically on obesity here.  That gives a ‘Top 10’ as follows, which is rather different from the list we started with above–note that the sample for City of London is probably too small to draw definite conclusions.

TABLE OF TOP 10 ENGLISH LOCAL AUTHORITIES FOR OBESITY

Area Name Weighted Sample % Obese
Halton 309 35.2%
Barnsley 609 34.4%
South Holland 231 32.5%
Mansfield 274 32.4%
Telford and Wrekin 401 32.3%
North Lincolnshire 424 32.0%
Barking and Dagenham 409 31.6%
East Lindsey 363 31.6%
Thurrock 379 31.4%
City of London 20 31.4%

While not all of the areas in the two datasets are identical, we can make a reasonable job of combining them for London as below.

CHART OF OBESITY ADMISSIONS AGAINST PREVALENCE

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Any relationship between the two is rather slight, and it does seem that Lambeth, Southwark and Lewisham have high rates of admission for their prevalence of obesity, rather than high obesity as such. It seems reasonable to conclude that we are seeing wide variations in the propensity to subject obesity to hospital treatments, rather than in obesity as such.

Inner London’s economy: What does it mean for Lewisham?

October 22, 2014

The Centre for Cities published a report entitled Inner London’s economy: a ward level analysis of the business and employment base   in October 2013.  It doesn’t look particularly encouraging for Lewisham, as in the following illustrations.

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Their Figure 2 shows that the population decreases during the day, implying that people go elsewhere to work (or perhaps study).

lewfig3Figure 3 shows no sign at all of any concentration of businesses  that might serve as a nucleus for further developments.

lewfig7Similarly, Figure 7 shows a rather limited number of start-ups.

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This may be explained, at least in part, by Figure 9, which shows that the accessibility of public transport is far from great.

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The maximum broadband speeds in Figure 10 might be more encouraging for Lewisham…if it wasn’t overshadowed by the need to make a point about more glamorous places…

So in conclusion we get a picture of Lewisham as somewhere people live so that they can work elsewhere but the state of the transport links means it’s not too easy.  That sounds like many parts of London in the 1970s:  a decaying nowhere, but surprisingly close at hand.  To be optimistic, it may be that even a slight improvement in transport will mean a substantial increase in house prices for Lewisham residents, and an influx of employment so they don’t have to use the transport after all.