Archive for the ‘Local’ Category

Joseph Henry Blackburne lived here

June 4, 2017

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50 Sandrock Road

J. H. Blackburne dominated British chess during the second half of the 19th century, and at one point he was the world’s second most successful player.

He is perhaps best known for losing heavily to Wilhelm Steinitz and for taking it badly, but according to the biography by Tim Harding he was living in 9 Whitbread Road, Brockley at the time of the 1901 census, later moving to 45 Sandrock Road and then number 50 in the same road, where he died on 1 September 1924.

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45 Sandrock Road

So number 45 has changed over the years more radically than number 50, but not as radically as the place in 9 Whitbread Road.

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Presumed site of 9 Whitbread Road

Now then, it is known that Blackburne was bombed-out during a German raid in the First World War, but the dates are such that it’s unlikely the view above came into being that way.

blackburne

J. H. Blackburne (1841-1924)

Now then Steinitz apparently lived in Shoreditch, which only adds to my suspicions that he was really Karl Marx on his day off…

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Ernest Dowson died here

April 17, 2017

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159 Sangley Road

According to Arthur Symons’s memoir of Ernest Dowson:

[he] died at 26 Sandhurst Gardens, Catford, S.E on Friday morning, February 23, 1900….[he] was found one day in a Bodega with only a few shillings in his pocket, and so weak as to be hardly able to walk, by a friend, himself in some difficulties, who immediately took him back to the bricklayer’s cottage in a muddy outskirt of Catford, where he was himself living…

Meanwhile the Lewisham Council website states:

Died in the house of a friend at 26 Sandhurst Gardens (now 159 Sangley Road),

and we presume they ought to be a reliable source for addresses in Catford.

The house above looks as though it was built around 1900, so the bricklayer may have been living there while working on other houses nearby (which is why it was muddy–largely bare ground or a building site rather than houses) and letting out rooms.

Romanian shop, 27 Winslade Way SE6

September 21, 2016

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We see that Catford has responded to Brexit-inspired xenophobia with a new Romanian shop in the shopping centre.  We say:  Good luck to them!  I couldn’t see anything to show the opening hours, but there’s some information on their Facebook page.

I want to know what the name means now…Maybe:

La =  chez/da/у

Moș = old man

Dănuț =  Danny

 

Barber Shop, Thomas Lane SE6

July 20, 2016

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We present the opening times for this barber’s in Catford, since there doesn’t seem to be any reliable information on the Internet. It was certainly open at 0915 today…and I got a haircut…

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Mozart & Salieri (Rimsky-Korsakov in Catford)

June 1, 2016

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We are informed:

Following a successful run at Phoenix Artist Club, Time Zone Theatre‘s immersive take on Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s opera MOZART & SALIERI comes to the Broadway Theatre Catford for two performances only on 13th & 14th July – info and booking here

What does ‘The Information Capital’ have to do with South London?

January 3, 2015

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This book presents 100 maps and graphics that will change the way you view the city.  Leaving aside Oliver Uberti’s…sketches…of some of the animals to be found in London Zoo, let’s have a look at some data and see what it means for South London.

South London--City Of Dreadful Night

South London–City Of Dreadful Night

The illustration above shows the locations where pictures posted on Flickr were taken.  Not South London it seems, apart from the Elephant, Walworth Road and Greenwich Park.  South Londoners are condemned to perpetual darkness, starved of the light of exposure on Flickr…

Concentrations of crime

Concentrations of violent crime

Here we see violent crime hotspots, which seem to pick out railway/Underground stations with unerring accuracy.  3 is Brixton, 8 the Elephant, 9 Peckham, 10 Croydon, 18 Woolwich.

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Deprivation

Above we see deprivation, coloured according to the scheme below:

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So, Lewisham varies between ‘Most deprived’ red and a yellow which has no label but probably means something neutral. If the green was instead blue on this map, one might begin to suspect some hidden agenda…

 

How we get to work...

How we get to work…

Here we have the most popular modes of transport for getting to work by home location, coded according to the scheme below.

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Cor, that’s found me out–when I lived in Peckham I used to get the bus to work, but now I get the train. Are those light blue types really driving to work or to the station say?

Occupational tree (or graph)

Occupational tree (or graph)

Now this would be really interesting if it was explained properly.  The idea is that wards are grouped together according to their concentrations of different job types; but we don’t learn what the distances or branching or angles mean.  My earliest memories are of Charlton 50 years ago and I’ve made it as far as Crofton Park, or travelled 3 nodes on this map.  Clearly I’ve not made very much progress at all, but it would be nice to know the details of my lack of achievement.

Cohabiting in Peckham

Cohabiting in Peckham

As for that love and romance thing, it is suggested that cohabiting is prevalent in Peckham (above) separation is noteworthy in New Cross (below).

Separated in New Cross

Separated in New Cross

Finally, we return to dodgy statistics on obesity.  The figure below shows obesity…

Obesity

Obesity

or rather, the boroughs expanded or contracted to reflect the percentage of 10-11 year olds there classified obese in 2012-13.  Which is a slightly strange measure to use–presumably those were the figures closest to hand.

So, Sarf London: a land of obesity and irregular liaisons, subsisting in obscurity (apart from Greenwich Park during the Olympics), lit only by the odd flare of crime…And no Tube either…

 

A shameful story about obesity

November 1, 2014

The figure above caused some animated discussion on Brockley Central, with many recondite hypotheses being advanced to explain the seeming kinship between South London and unimaginably remote parts of the North.

The first thing to do is to work out what this data is and what it might be telling us.  It certainly looks like Table 7.3, Finished Admission Episodes with a primary diagnosis of obesity, by Government Office Region (GOR) of residence, Strategic Health Authority (SHA) of residence, Primary Care Trust (PCT) of residence and gender, 2012/13 from the data here.  So what are these episodes about?  There are 10,957 of them, and there are 8,024 in Table 7.8 Finished Consultant Episodes with a primary diagnosis of obesity and a main or secondary procedure of ‘Bariatric Surgery’ by Government Office Region (GOR) of residence, Strategic Health Authority (SHA)  of residence, Primary Care Trust (PCT) of residence and gender, 2012/13.  While ‘Admission Episodes’ and ‘Consultant Episodes’ aren’t quite the same, it’s clear that T7.3 is largely about ‘bariatric surgery’, which includes stomach stapling, gastric bypasses and sleeve gastrectomy.  These procedures have traditionally had a fairly marginal place in the NHS, so we suspect that differences in the willingness to perform or to pay for these procedures may be the operative factor here.

There is data specifically on obesity here.  That gives a ‘Top 10’ as follows, which is rather different from the list we started with above–note that the sample for City of London is probably too small to draw definite conclusions.

TABLE OF TOP 10 ENGLISH LOCAL AUTHORITIES FOR OBESITY

Area Name Weighted Sample % Obese
Halton 309 35.2%
Barnsley 609 34.4%
South Holland 231 32.5%
Mansfield 274 32.4%
Telford and Wrekin 401 32.3%
North Lincolnshire 424 32.0%
Barking and Dagenham 409 31.6%
East Lindsey 363 31.6%
Thurrock 379 31.4%
City of London 20 31.4%

While not all of the areas in the two datasets are identical, we can make a reasonable job of combining them for London as below.

CHART OF OBESITY ADMISSIONS AGAINST PREVALENCE

CHART

Any relationship between the two is rather slight, and it does seem that Lambeth, Southwark and Lewisham have high rates of admission for their prevalence of obesity, rather than high obesity as such. It seems reasonable to conclude that we are seeing wide variations in the propensity to subject obesity to hospital treatments, rather than in obesity as such.

Inner London’s economy: What does it mean for Lewisham?

October 22, 2014

The Centre for Cities published a report entitled Inner London’s economy: a ward level analysis of the business and employment base   in October 2013.  It doesn’t look particularly encouraging for Lewisham, as in the following illustrations.

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Their Figure 2 shows that the population decreases during the day, implying that people go elsewhere to work (or perhaps study).

lewfig3Figure 3 shows no sign at all of any concentration of businesses  that might serve as a nucleus for further developments.

lewfig7Similarly, Figure 7 shows a rather limited number of start-ups.

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This may be explained, at least in part, by Figure 9, which shows that the accessibility of public transport is far from great.

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The maximum broadband speeds in Figure 10 might be more encouraging for Lewisham…if it wasn’t overshadowed by the need to make a point about more glamorous places…

So in conclusion we get a picture of Lewisham as somewhere people live so that they can work elsewhere but the state of the transport links means it’s not too easy.  That sounds like many parts of London in the 1970s:  a decaying nowhere, but surprisingly close at hand.  To be optimistic, it may be that even a slight improvement in transport will mean a substantial increase in house prices for Lewisham residents, and an influx of employment so they don’t have to use the transport after all.

 

 

Moving to Brockley (St Johns end)–18 pieces of advice

August 22, 2014

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1.  Avoid “Fantastic Morleys” on Endwell Road. It makes out it’s related to South London’s favourite chicken shop “Morley’s” but it definitely isn’t. They even got closed down for a few months for an “uncontrollable” cockroach infestation. Doesn’t seem to have put off the punters mind.

2.  Gulen’s on Brockley Road does a fine kebab and is on the way from Brockley station to St Johns. Engage them in conversation about their Ataturk frieze and they’ll treat you like a brother.

3.  Doorstop Bakery gently wafts the delightful smell of baking bread across Brockley of an evening. They make a good sandwich too.

4.  Brockley is now all kinds of gentrified so it has a couple of upmarket delis that are worth checking out.

5.  For some nice (slightly pricy) food and a good beer the Orchard on Harefield Road is a good shout. Gantry is meant to be nice too but I haven’t actually been.

6.  For a takeaway curry “Panas Gurka” is the only way to go for some Nepalese goodness.

7.  The dentist in New Cross is a bit ropey. A friend signed up for one that’s just opened in Honour Oak Park which he rated and which would be worth looking up.

8.  Ziman  (dentists in Crofton Park) are actually very good.

9.  The Wickham Arms on the top of the hill on Upper Brockley Road looks like it might be a nice pub. It’s not (unless it’s been done up in the last year or so).

10.  If you have a craving for late night confectionary you can always pop into Dukes “Night Store” on Brockley Cross.

11.  Don’t find yourself on top of Telegraph Hill in the middle of the night when there’s a pea-souper fog. You will get lost.

12.  It’s probably worthwhile getting a bike since it’s a bit spread out for taking the bus/walking.  Also all those hills mean you get some exercise without needing to travel very far.

13.  There’s a very good butcher’s in Ewhurst Road (Crofton Park).

14.  The Brockley Jack has very nice toilets and is reassuringly safe these days, nearly all the time.

15.  Less of an issue if you have a landlord/flatmates, but Terry’s (the locksmith next to Crofton Park station) have an emergency service and will come and rescue you, for a price.

16.  Worthwhile registering with a doctor while you’re not too busy–the shiny new health centre in Deptford might be your best bet.

17.  Some useful info about various subjects on Brockley Central.

18.  Deptford is covered by The Deptford Dame

Two radical addresses in South East London

December 1, 2013
26 Barset Road SE15

26 Barset Road SE15

According to Sarah Young’s map of ‘Russian’ sites in London, 26 Barset Road (as above) was one of the correspondence addresses for Iskra. Clearly this is not the same building as, and possibly not even the site of the original No. 26, which may have been something like these houses nearby:

Howbury Road may have the only original houses hereabouts

Howbury Road may have the only original houses hereabouts

Meanwhile, not so far away at 22 Stondon Park SE23 we find a house with a plaque to commemorate Jim Connell, who wrote the words to The Red Flag while coming home by train in 1889.

22 Stondon Park SE23

22 Stondon Park SE23

Shaky picture of plaque

Shaky picture of plaque

It’s interesting that the second verse

Look ’round, the Frenchman loves its blaze,
The sturdy German chants its praise;
In Moscow’s vaults its hymns are sung,
Chicago swells its surging song.

seems to refer to the Haymarket Affair of 1886, recently alluded to in this blog.  ‘Moscow’ could refer to the assassination of Alexander II in 1881 and the consequent loss of his proposed constitution and other liberalising reforms.